History of 3000

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JamieP
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History of 3000

Post by JamieP »

-*-Posted this elsewhere but would love to have some input, let me know if anything seems incorrect or is missed etc-*-

History of 3000

Frequently people want to know what standard or regulations are worked to or were worked to at a certain time, I'm still going to work towards the Regulations but I've developed a history of 3000 in NZ based on citations in Regulation. This goes from NZS3000:1997-AS/NZS3000:2007. It includes the Regulations that cite the standard, the version or amendment that caused it to come into play and the exact date it became law

The ones under the 1997 Regulations include the clauses relevant to the standard which gives details as to which parts are or aren't mandatory but also how using the whole standard was often an option for a means or one method of compliance

Under the 2010 Regulations, as you know, the whole standard was mandatory and there are far to many regulations that have 3000 in them so I've simply put the cited version and any modifications

Let me know what you think and if this is something useful or of interest to you and I'll consider doing so for other standards and possibly following the Regulations back a bit further than 1997

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Electricity Regulations 1997
Electricity Amendment Regulations 1999
25/11/1999

NZS3000:1997

"37. Testing-
(1) Any person carrying out prescribed electrical work that involves the construction of a low voltage electrical installation or part of such an installation must ensure that the work is tested in accordance with NZS 3000, ECP 11, or ECP 60 (which applies to Low Voltage AC Railway Signalling equipment)"

"69. Electrical safety-
(1) Works, electrical installations, fittings, electrical appliances, and associated equipment must be designed, constructed, maintained, installed, and used—
“(a)So as to be electrically safe; or
“(b)For electrical appliances hired, leased, or sold second-hand, so as to comply with the testing requirements of AS/NZ 3760:1996; or
“(c)For Type I or Type II RCD's used to supply power by a flexible cord and plug to electrical appliances that operate on the electrode boiler principle, so as to comply with AS 3190:1994; or
“(d)For portable electrical appliances used in constructing, moving, or demolishing a building, so as to comply with AS/NZS 3012: 1995; or
“(e)For electrical installations, so as to comply with NZS 3000; or
“(f)For all other fittings and electrical appliances, so as to comply with AS/NZS 4417: 1998.”
(2) Subject to subclauses (3) and (4), for the purposes of these regulations, "electrically safe" means that there is no significant risk of injury or death to any person, or of damage to any property, as a result of the use of the works, electrical installations, fittings, electrical appliances, or associated equipment, or the passage of electricity through those works, electrical installations, fittings, electrical appliances, or associated equipment, as the case may be.
(3) For the purposes of this regulation, fittings and electrical appliances that are designed and used for medical treatment are not electrically unsafe merely because that medical treatment may cause injury to the patient.
(4) For the purposes of this regulation, fittings and electrical appliances that are designed and used for animal stunning, meat conditioning, or fishing are not electrically unsafe merely because they may injure animals or fish, as the case may be.""

"87. Construction of works and electrical installations-
(1) Subject to subclause (2), works and electrical installations are deemed not to be electrically safe for the purpose of regulation 69 where-
(a) The characteristics of any fittings are impaired in construction; or
(b) Conductors within them are not adequately identified in accordance
with regulation 71; or
(c) Connections between conductors, and between conductors and other fittings, are not safe and reliable; or
(d) Fittings are installed in such a way that any designed cooling conditions are impaired; or
(e) Fittings which cause or are subject to high temperatures or electric arcs are placed in such a position or are unguarded so as to create a risk of ignition of flammable materials or of injury to persons or damage to property; or
(f) Cables, including underground cables, are not adequately protected against the risk of damage by nature of their covenng or their
method of installation; or
(g) Cables are bent beyond their design criteria; or
(h) There is insufficient space, access, or lighting to operate, maintain, repair, test, or inspect all fittings of the works or electrical installation, other than cables, in a safe manner.
(2) Regulation 69(1) is satisfied if,—
“(a)For the installation of cables, ECP 28 is complied with; and
“(b)For the installation and use of metal sheathed mineral insulated cables and fittings, ECP 33 is complied with; and
“(c)For electrical wiring work in domestic premises, ECP 51 is complied with; and
“(d)For electrical installations, NZS 3000 is complied with.”
(3) Works and electrical installations must be constructed so as to
minimise the risk of-
(a) Electric shock; and
(b) Fire and burns.
(4) Compliance with-
(a) ECP 7, in respect of extra-low voltage installations:
(b) ECP 34, in respect of electrical safety distances:
(c) ECP 35, in respect of power systems earthing, is deemed to be compliance with subclause (3) (a).
(5) Compliance with ECP 19, in respect of electrical installations, is deemed to be compliance with subclause (3) (b).
(6) Where the supply of electricity within the
electrical installation is limited so that shock currents and their duration cannot exceed the IEC shock currents standard, subclause (3) (a) is deemed to be complied with."

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Electricity Regulations 1997
Electricity Amendment Regulations 2002
01/01/2003

AS/NZS3000:2000

"37 Testing of prescribed electrical work
(1)A person who carries out prescribed electrical work on works or electrical installations must ensure that—
(a)the conductors or fittings on which the work was done are tested to ensure the operational safety of the completed work; and
(b)in the case of maintenance, alterations, or additions, the work does not reduce the safety of existing works or electrical installations; and
(c)during testing, all practicable steps are taken to ensure the safety of persons, property, and the works and electrical installations.
(2)Except as provided in regulation 45, the requirements in subclause (1) must be completed before the conductors or fittings on which the work has been done are connected to a supply of electricity.
(3)Except as provided in subclause (4), a person who carries out prescribed electrical work on a low voltage electrical installation must ensure that work is tested and verified in accordance with section 6 of AS/NZS 3000 after the work is complete and before the installation is connected to a supply of electricity (unless the installation is connected solely for the purpose of testing, certification, or inspection under these regulations).
(4)A person who carries out work on low voltage a.c. railway signalling equipment must ensure that the work is tested in accordance with ECP 60."

"69A Electrical installations
(1)Except as provided in regulation 72(3), electrical installations must comply with clauses 1.6 to 1.10, 2.2, and 3.5.2 of AS/NZS 3000.
(2)An electrical installation complies with subclause (1) and regulation 53(3) if it complies with sections 2 to 5 and 7 of AS/NZS 3000.
(3)Low voltage domestic and residential type areas of electrical installations must comply with clauses 2.5.3.1 and 2.5.3.2 of AS/NZS 3000, except in the circumstances described in clause 2.5.3.4 of that standard.
(4)However, subclause (3) does not apply to socket-outlets in electrical installations covered by AS/NZS 3003 that are installed in accordance with the requirements of that standard."

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Electricity Regulations 1997
Electricity Amendment Regulations 2003
08/01/2004

AS/NZS 3000:2000; and includes Amendment 3: 2003

"37 Testing of prescribed electrical work
(1)A person who carries out prescribed electrical work on works or electrical installations must ensure that—
(a)the conductors or fittings on which the work was done are tested to ensure the operational safety of the completed work; and
(b)in the case of maintenance, alterations, or additions, the work does not reduce the safety of existing works or electrical installations; and
(c)during testing, all practicable steps are taken to ensure the safety of persons, property, and the works and electrical installations.
(2)Except as provided in regulation 45, the requirements in subclause (1) must be completed before the conductors or fittings on which the work has been done are connected to a supply of electricity.
(3)Except as provided in subclause (4), a person who carries out prescribed electrical work on a low voltage electrical installation must ensure that work is tested and verified in accordance with section 6 of AS/NZS 3000 after the work is complete and before the installation is connected to a supply of electricity (unless the installation is connected solely for the purpose of testing, certification, or inspection under these regulations).
(4)A person who carries out work on low voltage a.c. railway signalling equipment must ensure that the work is tested in accordance with ECP 60."

"69A Electrical installations
(1)Except as provided in regulation 72(3), electrical installations must comply with clauses 1.6 to 1.10, 2.2, and 3.5.2 of AS/NZS 3000.
(2)An electrical installation complies with subclause (1) and regulation 53(3) if it complies with sections 2 to 5 and 7 of AS/NZS 3000.
(3)Low voltage domestic and residential type areas of electrical installations must comply with clauses 2.5.3.1 and 2.5.3.2 of AS/NZS 3000, except in the circumstances described in clause 2.5.3.4 of that standard.
(4)However, subclause (3) does not apply to socket-outlets in electrical installations covered by AS/NZS 3003 that are installed in accordance with the requirements of that standard."

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Electrical (Safety) Regulations 2010
As Made
01/04/2010
(Note there was a 2 year transitional period for installs started before this date so some installs still could be compliant under 1997 Regulations up until the 31/03/2012 if started before this date)

AS/NZS 3000:2007: Electrical installations (known as the Australian/New Zealand Wiring Rules): including Amendment 1

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Electrical (Safety) Regulations 2010
Electrical (Safety) Amendment Regulations 2011
10/11/2011

AS/NZS 3000:2007: Electrical installations (known as the Australian/New Zealand Wiring Rules): including Amendment 1 and Amendment A

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Electrical (Safety) Regulations 2010
Electrical (Safety) Amendment Regulations 2013
31/12/2013

AS/NZS 3000:2007: Electrical installations (known as the Australian/New Zealand Wiring Rules): including Amendments 1 and 2, subject to the following modifications:
1. In 4.5.2.3.2, change “warning sign shall be installed” to “warning sign shall be installed or fitted in domestic installations but may be omitted from all other installations”.
2. In 4.18.1(b) and (c), change “all live (active and neutral) conductors” to “all active conductors”.
3. Add a new paragraph to 4.18.2: “In New Zealand, only electrical equipment that is directly associated with the gas supply may be installed in the hazardous areas of a domestic installation, shown in figure 4.10.”
4. Replace 4.18.3 with “In New Zealand, only electrical equipment (including metering equipment) that is directly associated with the gas supply may be installed in the exclusion zones of a domestic installation in figure 4.11.”
pluto
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Re: History of 3000

Post by pluto »

The standards you quote are a amall part of applicable Electrical Wiring Regulations, Codes of Practice and Standards used for electrical installations over the years and many have never been altered since the original installation took place and was inspected.
the fill list is

Electrical Wiring Regulations 1927 (limited number of installations) inspection by electrical Supply Authority
Electrical Wiring Regulations 1935 (limited number of installations) inspection by electrical Supply Authority
Electrical Wiring Regulations 1961 (medium number of installations) inspection by electrical Supply Authority
Electrical Wiring Regulations 1976 (medium number of installations) inspection by electrical Supply Authority
Electical Regulations 1993 Self inspection + high risk inspector by another person
Electrical Regulations 1997 Self inspection + high risk inspector by another person
Electrical Regulations 2007 + AS/NZS 3000 Self inspection + high risk inspector by another person
Electrical (Safety) Regulations 2010 + AS/NZS 3000 Self inspection + high risk inspector by another person
AlecK
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Re: History of 3000

Post by AlecK »

Pluto's list includes an entry for "Electrical Regulations 2007 + AS/NZS 3000".
No such Regulations were ever promulgated.


The1993 Regs were issued under a significantly revised Electricity Act; so many of the changes related to aligning with that.
The principal changes for Electricians related to two areas
First around certification & inspection; to
- do away with regional Electrical Supply Authorities; and
- replace the system of Permit-to-work followed by Notice-of-completion with simpler system for CoCs (this new system was widely - but incorrectly - known as "self-certification"); and
- remove the requirement for all installation work to be Inspected by a third party; instead only requiring specified types of work to be inspected.
- introduce independent Inspectors to carry out the require Inspections (previously only those employed by an ESA could be an Inspector).

1993 also removed on from having almost all the requirements within the Regulations; to having Regs set high-level outcomes (eg "must be safe"; and leave the technical & advisory "how to do it" stuff in other documents (eg ECPs) as recognised means of compliance. Very little, if any, of this material was mandatory.



1997 continued the process
The 1997 Regs remained in force until ESRs 2010; ie some thirteen years; and during that time had 2 Amendments (compare 1976 Regs; that had some 8? Amendments over their 21 year life).
The first Amendment (1999) introduced NZS 3000: 1997 (and a bunch of ECPs) as recognised means of compliance, with effect from 16/11/99.
The second Amendment (2002) moved on to instead recognise AS/NZS 3000:2000 as means of compliance, with effect from 1/1/03.
It also made some specified clauses of the Standard mandatory.
There were no further Amendments prior to ESRs coming into force 1/4/2010

The principal change with 2010 ESRs was to make compliance with "3000" generally mandatory
As with earlier Regs; there have been a number of amendments to ESRs in the 20+ years since they came into force.
2011: General tidy-up / tweaking; Part 1 assessments for imported caravans; revised citations in Schedules 2 & 4 ,
2012: Re-shuffle & further tweaking; Risk categories for PEW; signs when working; Certified Designs (replacing previous declarations of conformity);
changes to req'd content of CoC; RoIs (instead of just counter-signing CoC); ESCs; etc (some of the changes appeared huge, but were in fact more of a re-jig that achieved essentially the same outcome by different words in re-shuffled Regs).
2013: More tweaking; whole new Part for mining; updated citations.
And more since (but nothing significant).



I admire the intent behind preparing a history; but it quickly gets (very) complex.
Before you can even begin to work out what the "rules" were at the time something was installed; we first have to be able to establish that date with reasonable accuracy. Which ain't easy; and is mostly dependent on individual experience - the longer working in nthe trade, and the wider they type(s) of work carried out; the more data we can call on.
The timelines for any particular aspect are similar but different; as various documents were updated and subsequently the revised versions were cited; all within a Regs famework that's been gradually changing in accordance with development of several broad-brush themes.


One of the themes has been to move technical detail out of Regs and instead use other documents to establish compliance with high-level required outcomes. Largely complete; but subject to ongoing review.
Another theme has been the certification / Inspection system established 1993 but which has been tweaked several times since.
And another has been to remove all HSW-related requirements ; so as to be enforces under HSW Act instead of Electricity Act. That process is as yet incomplete.

It's not hard to follow these broad themes at Regs level; and only a bit harder to track more specific regulatory requirements.
But tracking the history of provisions of other documents requires an individual time-line for each such document; then from that you can follow how the provision has changed and whether, at the relevant time, it was mandatory to comply.

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WRT "3000":

NZS 3000: 1997 was cited by 1997 Regs in 1999; but nothing? was mandatory. Citation revoked 2003.
- Specifically R 6 of Electricity Amendment Regs amended R 69 of the 1997 Regs (the one requiring outcome of all installation work to be electrically safe); by introducing "to comply with NZS 3000" as an alternative(for installations) to "to be electrically safe".
This is similar to, but NOT the same as, "deemed to be safe if complies"; it was a choice between two options.

AS/NZS 3000: 2000 was cited by 2002 Amendment; applicable from 1/1/03.
Specifically R 69 removed the choice, and introduced the "deemed to comply" concept for the Standard as a whole; while at same time making compliance with some specified clauses mandatory.
This edition of "3000" had three Amendments; but I don't believe that the Regs citation was ever updated. It only matters for the few amendments that affected mandated clauses; and only because without a change in the citation the original clause remained mandatory and the amendment to it had no legally enforceable effect.

AS/NZS 3000: 2007 wasn't cited until 2010 ESRs, the citation including Amdt 1; effective 1/4/2010.
The entire Standard was mandated; with a choice between following Part 1 or Part 2 for some installations.
Citation updated to include (NZ-only) Amdt A, by ESRs Amendment late 2011. (Amdt brought in "downlight" classifications, and required assumption that BTI would be installed in structures if not already there).
Citation updated to include Amdt 2, by ESRs Amendment late 2013; with part of that (including the updated citations) applying from 31/12/13 and the rest from 1/2/14.
JamieP
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Re: History of 3000

Post by JamieP »

Yeah I do understand this, I more starting looking at it for my own personal reference and to help build my knowledge but just thought I would share incase it was of any use to anyone else

At least gives a brief look into things, appreciate the input
AlecK
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Re: History of 3000

Post by AlecK »

For Regs, there's always a "commencement date", generally Reg 1 is "Title" & Reg 2 is "Commencement" . For ESRs 2010; it was given simply as 1 April 2010, so that one is easy. They don't change that Reg when amendments happen; but each amendment is published as a separate "Electricity (Safety) Amendment Regs" (or similar; always just adding 'Amendment" into the title); with its own commencement date (or sometimes dates). Sometimes it's not given as a specific calendar date but instead as eg "21 days after publication in Gazette". Which means you need that publication date to do the calculation, and that's very difficult to trace later on.

For Standards; the date of publication is always given at front; but what we need is date of citation.

I find it helps to make a note of date of coming into force.
Eg at the front of a hard copy, or maybe as a text file log of dates
Unless you keep up some sort of record as things happen; it's nearly impossible to track down effective commencement dates later on.

The other thing to watch is that sometimes there's a "soft" change; generally under a Reg with a heading such as "transitional arrangements"
That means there can be a period when work already started can be carried on under same rules up until a cut-off date, while new work has to be done under the new rules.

There's been some talk that next Regs amendment may have a "dual citation"; meaning that work could be done to either of two cited versions of '3000'. Point being that the date of a revised / amended Standard coming into force isn't necessarily the close-off date for the earlier version.
But for most purposes it's good enough.
JamieP
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Re: History of 3000

Post by JamieP »

I noticed on most the documents they actually have the date of gazette on them, think it was right at the end of them because I used said date when needing to work out when certificate documents came into force as you said
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